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is for the costa country club's outdoor activity and the second is reserved for the use of open space for the current residential unit on the 3rd floor. the difference would be the current proposal, the area would be separated by an hvac installation instead of the previous fixed planters. the project requires the planning commission a restaurant on the ground floor pursuant to planning code section 715.44. the second action is for the legalization of a change of occupancy of a residential use to a non-residential use to the castro country club. pursuant to -- i'm sorry -- the country club with the second floor outdoor activity area. and that basically the department would still maintain the original recommendation for approval. this is for a recommendation for approval for the proposed restaurant on the ground floor. it is not a formula retail use, but rather an independent, locally-owned business. it is designed to serve residents from the neighborhood, and patrons of other businesses on castro or 18th street and it's not a destination restaurant. no. 3, it contributes to the ec
how movement in the city can help us establish patterns, trends, and other things. and they're going to share that data with us. and i believe that data is going to be value with us as we figure out challenges like the small businesses along west portal or in terra val, along 3rd street who see their vacancies and they ask the mayor, how can you invest in neighborhood strategy work a little better with us to attract people to come and be customers in our neighborhood, coffee shops, restaurants, salons and other things? how can we do that? we've always scratched our head saying, you kind of have to do it yourself. you have to create your ideas yourself. and now we're saying, well, maybe there is data out there that could help establish some best practices, can help maybe quicken the ideas of what might be more attracted to our smaller neighborhoods. well, this is the kind of data out there, analytics, if you will, the analytical model that are being created by our local san francisco companies like motion loft and others, who are using these data yet can share it with the government a
that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way t
francisco. so, all of us can stop looking at the death of george moscone and start to put him firmly in our hearts so we can see the likes of him in new community leaders, young artists, queer and colorful, innovators and students, all inside our magnificently and uniquely diverse and never-changing city. san francisco will never be what it was, nothing in life will be. but as i heard recently, we are always nostalgic for a time that never was and often wanting to avoid a future that is inevitable. will change in san francisco as in everywhere is inevitable. and change can be beautiful. we are all of us the agents of change. as george and harvey were. each one of us is the story teller of our lives and the lives of the people we've lost. and that wasn't always the case, as willie mentioned. but because of the likes of george and harvey and so many others, all the way to our mayor ed lee, all of us have voice. all of us can tell the story. so, let's crowd source this thing. let's tell the real stories of george and harvey. stories of their hard work and politics and the families and loved on
, commissioners, planning staff. the project before you is the second conditional use authorization request from domino's pizza and the proposal is to establish a new formula retail lease at 1109 fillmore and golden gate avenue. the proposed site is located along the district along the western addition neighborhood district. it currently operates three blocks north of the proposed site and it's vacating the space and moving to 1109 fillmore, which is occupied by a limit the restaurant use as well. according to new information by the project sponsor since the release of the report they want to relocate in the immediate area. as already presented the applicant has submitted two conditional use authorization requests before you, the first to relocate his existing building to the 1109 fillmore site and the alternate at 3015 geary boulevard is the one that was previously heard under item 156789 the subject neighborhood is characterized by a diverse mix of goods and services. the subject nine-block district span president bush street, southward to mcallister street. the corridor is well-served by tran
). >> with the african slave trade he used to be in the ports. this type of boxes. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they were sit over these big boxes and play over them. >> (speaking spanish). >> but for the blacks these type of instruments were not allowed to be played because they were too loud and for the church they will provoke movement that was not appropriate. >> (speaking spanish). >> they could also work as a form of communication with the drumming patterns. >> (speaking spanish). >> this was what was going on in africa. >> (speaking spanish). >> and from some of the sounds they used to play that we almost lost all of them we still have some that he remembers. >> (speaking spanish). >> for instance -- >> (speaking spanish). >> this means "attention be alert. something is going to happen". >> (speaking spanish). >> wake up. wake up. >> wake up, wake up. (speaking spanish). >> and this are some of the drumming patterns that have been rescued by the cultural association. >> (speaking spanish). >> the african and review itse s size. >> (speaking spanish). >> to the actual size that he has. >> (spea
can tell us when we are done what it is. something will repeat 3 times. [applause] okay. which one of you figured it out? yes. >> 49, hum... >> i can see how you would say that, why do you say that? there is 49 of something. okay. did you notice the turns? the spins? how many were there in one piece? yes. no. yes. 9. how many times did we repeat that? how many times? 3. 9 times 3 -- is 27. we did 27 turns but we were going, 1, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1. that's a sophisticated math concept, you were not wrong. i bet you will grow up to be a mathematician. i will give you my address you will have to send me your first paycheck because i taught you this. at this point we would like to thank you very much for coming. if you have any questions. i don't know if we want to open it you will for questions. may be just a few? okay. yes. what's your question? >> how do we get in this program? that is a good question. >> it's an interesting question because the answer with the 3 of us is the same. what i want to point out i look like i might be from india when i talk i sound like i'm from america. my
could use the language of " to the point of no disturbance to the spa or the cinema". >>: if we are testing at 74, it has to be high enough noise. >>: we would be determining the maximum level. >> commissioner antonini: the maximum expected level of noise that could be generated by activities in there. >>: commissioner sugaya. >> commissioner sugaya: i would like to pursue that a little bit. my concern is that the project sponsor went ahead in light of the independent commission's 74decibel limit to push beyond that. there is no excuse to me for having done that. that is why the sound engineer is here to say we pushed it to the other side of the wall. also the number of violations between the time we heard it and continued it and today also does not give me a lot of confidence. i feel that one of the issues with the sound testing i think is -- and the sound experts can take this into consideration when they do their test because i think that is where we are headed, at different frequencies there are different impacts on the other side of the wall. if i'm sitting in the t
and be very creative. i talk about some of the data sets we use. most people still don't know they exist despite great efforts from the city and others. and, you know, a lot of entrepreneurs that we're looking for is the way to get leverage, a way to build an experience or build a product before we have 100,000 users using it. open data is the key way to do that. you can start out with this experience, very lively and robust with very few users. and then when the first users come in, there is actually something for them to do and see. and i think that you'll start to see as the data sets get more robust and a little bit better and hopefully as we get to improve them ourselves and put them back into the public domain, the innovation that comes off with them is just going to grow exponentially. >> this seems like a really important moment. the world of civic innovation until now has really been focused on sort of open public data and the private data world has been separate. the fact that the city realizes that it is private data that adds to that and provides so much more richness because
] >> i saw merl and larry, if you want to join us. as we said, this building is complex. and it starts with the funding. it will get more complicated with the construction pretty soon, but it has really been an unbelievable group effort to pull together the different funders of this work. we heard about the koret's foundation amazing con tributionss and i know there have been so many amazing contributions on the st. anthony side. for an affordable housing project for this it takes incredible people and we start with hud, who supplied over $20 million to make this project possible. larry ferguson is here, the director of the hud 202 programs that gets the senior housing funds and an important thing to know about the hud 202 programs not only do they provide capital, but a rental subsidy. so seniors on social security, or even less income don't have to worry about whether they can make a $1,000 rent payment. they pay 30% of whatever they can pay and the federal government helps us make up the difference, so we can keep people housed. there are folks out there who understand why this is
in developing this. so, as far as creating access to the public, using the open data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch
're focused on ammunition and immediate interruption in the behavior that law enforcement advises us and sees every day that leads to more violence. in the weeks and months to come, the board and the mayor's office will be introducing both more ideas and legislation and resolutions to support federal and state efforts in the same direction. at the same time, we'll also be introducing through our budget support for an ongoing organizing in our community to support nonlaw enforcement efforts to reduce violence, whether it's education, social services, housing, none of that escapes us as to their link in efforts to reduce violence in our society. with that i want to thank everybody for coming today. and i would ask everyone in san francisco, if not the whole region and the state, to please join us in a national moment of silence that will occur tomorrow morning east coast time, it will be 9:30 a.m., and here in san francisco it will be 6:30 a.m. for a national moment of silence to remember all the victims in sandy hook. of course, at the same time, remember all the victims at our own locally it
usually other shops cult the fish very thin, like a very thin piece of cake. sometimes they use sponge cake instead. that is terrible. it's something good about it. fish cake very good. [slirping] good noodles. all good soup. i could eat another bowl of noodles but maybe not today. it's 16 or more. i have smaller change. can i give it to you're in your hand. i pay you one coin at a time. one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, so what time is it now? it's nine. >> ten, eleven. i see 16 more. i will come back same time. thank you very much. the clever man left the noodle shop. he saw the whole thing behind the wall. he gave the noodle man so many compliments and he was going to ask for this count so. he ask strange question. one, two, three, four, five, what time is it now? nine. ten eleven, twelve. why did he ask such a question. one, two, three four, five, what time is it now. nine, ten, eleven, this is the ten. oh, i see. that was the victory. i'm going to do the same thing tomorrow night. this man goes through all the change and went outlooking for the noodle shop.
encostic casement of skin rig motor us framed the opened mouths scream. wail for your mother wrap our sons in silken ribbons in a galaxy. the cause has been perp traited. we are adrift on a baron sea. the fleet diminishes me. who shouts for us now, dear empire? this next one is a postcard for a reason that i kept of harold's club in reno, nevada. i don't know if it exists it's a really old postcard. harold's club made we think of harold and the purple crayon. harold's club. who would figure let loose the boy with the purple crayon. let him conkokt the loses slots in women. let loose his imagination. ended as high as sea gulls or the reverse w's topped with bold topped centers the rudeaments of the buzzum and life itself. >> pen and ink. in the way we demonstrate speech by quotation marks the ill administrator kapt urs speed by 2 lines of the pen much the trotting horse quoted at the knees all 4 and the lady side saddled atop him frozen in place by crossed hatched marks. courseut to indicate the petticoat aroused into activity by the muscular steed. unintended garden. whether o(inaudible)
care to help us support the jobs that we need to build for our families. and i know as your kids growing up, they're going to understand these things more and more as they take up more responsibilities, right now keeping you from your brand-new bedrooms clean. [laughter] >> helping mom with the dishes, cleaning up to get your education to be the best person you want to be and go for the jobs you always wanted to have. this is the promise we have. it isn't just the physical structure. i know ms. youngblood and i know all of the people that have been invested in this dream know it for sure, that it takes a really whole community to do this. that's why we had such a great development team that came together and worked with us. john stewart, john is right here being led with his development team. we have howard here as well. you have the ridge point, which is i think the most mature of the housing managers here, ridge point's been around since '68, right? >> that's right. >> and all of you amassed together with the mayor's office of housing with hope sf, with the housing authority to
promised that they would bring us and consultant to make recommendations about noise abatement and containment, we still don't have that. what we have is a report that you have not received. we welcomed the consultants. instead we have a report that you now have. is asking for permission to go 20 decibels or more above the nubmer that the inspector for the entertainment commission has established. that is not responsible; that is not working to try to abate the noise. they want the ability to go higher. consider also the citations that pa'ina has already received. look at the citations. it paints a dangerous picture about the fact that pa'ina is already in violation of the liquor license, of the entertainment commission. >> president fong: next speaker please. >>: and kathy nelson, director of the kabuki spa. i agree with everything that nancy and mr. feinman have said. i will also say in their favor that every time we called in the last several months, they have taking care of it. that is where i am at. i feel like i don't know -- but thanks. >>: left and the commissioner
in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to san francisco. we have experienced so much of the italian talent here in san francisco. that's why we wanted to be celebrating here and i am so glad to be joined not only by senator leno and assembly man amaino and david chiu and scott wiener as well. they all want to get in on this great celebration because it's wonderful for our city. i have often said our city and our strength is our international status and we do that with all the sister cities, with all of the flag raisings, but this is kind of new. what i said to our counsel general it's special because it's kind of bringing forth the things that we h
or someone you love, call 1-800-662-help. brought to you by the u.s. department of health and human services. [horns honking] [siren wails] announcer: big dreams and goodrades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to knowhow2go.org. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> the san francisco playground's history dates back to 1927 when the area where the present playground and center is today was purchased by the city for $27,000. in the 1950s, the center was expanded by then mayor robinson and the old gym was built. thanks to the passage of the 2008 clean and safe neighborhood parks bond, the sunset playground has undergone extensive renovation to its four acres of fields, courts, play grounds, community rooms, and historic gymnasium. >> here we are. 60 years and $14 million later, and we have got this beautiful, brand-new rec center completely accessible to the entire neighborhood. >> the new rec center houses multi-purpose rooms for all kinds of activities, including basketball, line dancing, p
policing using both data and technology to help us do that. and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i have shared that emotional e
out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have people actually
of a garden tour and a lot of us thought, a garden tour? our neighborhood? who is going to come? well, we had every -- we've done it for six years. every year we've grown incrementally. after the first two years of raising money for the library -- there's our new library -- we then it was such a great community builder that we recently decided to keep wanting to volunteering and do it. we established a scholarship at city college for the horticultural department. and we have just gone gangbusters. we get good press and we get to see everybody's neighbor -- all our neighbors' gardens. because of the way san francisco s you get to be veuyer because usually you have to go through their garage or their house to see the gardens. and ruth gets known through the neighborhood because she's constantly peeking over fences and leaving fliers in people's mailboxes saying, do you want to be on the garden tour, and all this sort of thing. but anyway, so, we've -- just to show you how much the neighborhood has gotten to know each other, all the people in the portola, wave your hand. [cheering and applauding
permit from the entertainment commission. they don't need any approval from us in order to continue to operate in that mode. part of that permit from the entertainment commission limits the hours to 10 o'clock. and also as i think we heard earlier that the epidemic commission has conducted its own tests and recommended conditions for the permit with the decibel limit of 74. now, in terms of -- that's sort of the basics. in terms of this cu we are asked in essence to allow them to expand the operation. then they can go back of entertainment for another level of permit. is that right? >>: that is correct. they are operating as an accessory use. by definition the limited use is limited to square feet and not past 10. it is subject to conditions imposed by the commission. limited live also by definition is a secondary purpose of the establishment. this would give them more flexibly. planning commission has the ability to limit the hours of operation. >>: do we have the ability to limit the decibel limit? >>: the planning commission has no past. >>: in terms of some of the infor
of the side staircases because for our community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years later, we've made a lot of strides in the lgbt community, but we still have so much work to do around hiv issues, around our youth, around discrimination, around transinclusion, and all the things that we know that harvey had he been here today would still be working on and leading on. and, so, we have to keep doing our work. and frankly, we can't take for granted that queer people are going to keep getting elected to office if we don't work on that and focus on that, we'll quickly slide back. so, we're here today to remember and also to look forward. so, it is my great honor to turn the mic over to our mistress of ceremonies, one of harvey's legislative aides and now the director of emergency management in san francisco and one of my absolute favorite people in city hall, the great ann kronenberg. [cheering and applauding] >> i have to move this mic down a little bit, superviso
awards here at san francisco city hall. thank you all so much for joining us here tonight. it is an honor to be here. my name is daniel homsby and i am the program manager for the neighborhood department networks. an honor to see you here. many of the same faces for the fifth year for the men awards. let's give you an a plays for coming back. (applause) >> and celebrating one of the most important things we have in san francisco, which is our neighborhoods. without further ado, i'd like to start the program off by introducing my colleague, christina palone, the new director for the mayor's office for neighborhoods. christina palone. (applause) >> good evening, everyone. i'm happy to be a part of such a great ebit that celebrates the contributions made by residents and organizations throughout the city to make san francisco one of the greatest places to live. the mayor's office of neighborhood services also known as mons focuses on neighborhood outreach and engagement. it is an honor to be here with community leaders who are dedicated to the same principles and are positive
, and value, those are the things that we always talk about and our company still really uses those as our cornerstone today. so, i think that's pretty amazing. >> well, there's 2 things, first of all, you got to get a family that gets along. >> ha ha ha. >> and the second thing is that we have just been dedicated to producing a quality product. and we love our work, as they say. i should be retired, but i'd probably be divorced because i'd be too much time at home. >> for "california country," i'm tracy sellers. by the way, if you like those recipes that chef todd whipped up, they're actually on our website, so check them out. coming up next, you know, there are a lot of farms in california, but none quite like this next one. stay tuned fgr it after the break. >> welcome back to "california country." you know, the great thing about living in california is it seems like just about anything can grow here. don't believe me? well, check out this next story as proof. so i've been working on this show for about 8 years now, and i am still amazed at all of the things that can grow here in califo
're still working out the kinks over here. can you tell us a little slack here. see, mr. gibbs, how are you? >>> i'm good. >> good, thank you for your service as well. can you tell me how long you served on the commission? prior? >>> probably 15 years. >> you served on the veteran affairs commission. what capacity were you serving? >>> as president for two years, otherwise i was commissioner. >> um-hm. and what were the circumstances that lead you to leave the commission? you said -- >>> i moved to europe. >> okay. >>> yeah. >> and you came back and you're looking to volunteer some more time, right? >>> yeah, yeah. i thought it's a position i could be in, have a voice in, yes. >> 15 years is a long time. that's very impressive. can you point to some successes or some of the things or projects that you worked on while you were on the commission? >>> for me, successes right now, i think the commission is strong right now than it's ever been. in terms of personal suck is hetionvxes, i can't speak of any. >> come on, you were president. you did something. >>> i'm telling you the truth. for me a
in the future. it's phenomenal to have such a champion here today with us to bring that word back to the folks. [phra*-uplt/] >> i'm going to do more thank yous as we go through the process, but i wanted to just turn it over to barry to talk a little bit about this from the st. anthony's perspective. >> thank you, doug. it's already been said a number of times already today, this is exciting. many of us have been waiting a long, long time for this day. of course we're all here today to celebrate something new. but when i look out on all of you gathered here, i see something very familiar about this gathering. yes, we're here to break ground on something new, a new buildings that will house the new st. anthony's dining room and 90 units of affordable housing for our seniors, sponsored by mercy. but when i look out and i see all of these different people gathered here, jones and golden gate, i'm sorry struck by how in so many ways it's very normal and natural. there is nothing different about today than other days. people hanging out, on this corner, is nothing new. yes, a new venture with mer
's face i see who's eyes i hold tight fixod this comp us i see the war coming breaking lose in the mouths. they are monsters who can't see the people who will weep. they're are creators of the destruction that begins on the tongue and ends in the cold eyes of tomorrow. [applause] >> last year, i read 9 stories in my allotted 6 minutes this year i thought i would be ambitious and do 10. first is called cosmology. after they learned that the universe was a mass produced toy tossed by a goddess they no longer wondered by laws was sure in the clockwork in a wind up bird were shot with uncertainties. optimists contributed the reason to the fact that the toy was broken. pessimists acknowledged this. but insistd that in it's broken state could the cosmos belong to those who lives within. the goddess grown found the universe under board games in a closet. she did not give it to her children. she did not have it fixed by her husband instead slipping away now and then from her family she delighted in the haphazard way it ran. the release in her life. >> the next one is entitled. explanation. twis
unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wonderful organization to be involved with obviously coming from buy right where really everyone is treated very much like family. coming into 18 reasons which even more community focused is such a treat. we have these events in the evening and we really try and bring people together. people come in in groups, meet friends that they didn't even know they had before. our whole set up is focused on communal table. you can sit
to see how they go together and how they function. we had a presentation to us recently on replacement of what are called the wind locks which are small structures below the deck, either side of the towers that tie the suspended road bed and trusses to the towers. this probably gets boring for the rest of you, but it's the kind of thing that throws me. and i remember looking at the drawing and seeing a single pin that actually performed the function, a pin that then had to take the load -- the entire wind load along all the surface of the bridge and its cables and just being thrilled at the concept of the load that thing must take and the calculationses that have gone into it and how it went together and how it's going to have to go together again when they change the duct. so, i look forward to another opportunity, if you'll give it to me, to serve the city on the bridge district board and thank you for your time. >> thank you. there's a question. supervisor cohen. >> sorry. i was sending a text message, so, he's lucky. i do have a question. i'll call him back up and ask him one. anyw
into the desert within us or listened for the gutterals longed deep within our throats, you would have come bearing gifts. i have nothing in red that i would not abide in green. el batanabi wrote the heart of our silken tanab, what need have we for you? no poem has ever enough red but that its blood might river beneath the veins of its people. beneath the desert sun, one man by one man by one man breathes six. thousands of tons wrung sonorous from the sky. where is god? black-eyed woman, the street dogs are running wild. will you save me? simple white ignorance, even the desert has gone into hiding. there is no more meaning here than the crested moon holds towards a dying grove of date trees. i am for the arabic, for the transcription of the arabic, zato dates over fire-baked bread. the twin rivers have already called for us a history. our poets have already explained to us the desert. by what right have you come? who have you have seen the rustic crane in the tree, no chimes but for its delicate wide beak, ushers an intemperate reprieve? 33 beads on a string, why pretend to know beyond the
there is a bunch of broken pottery so you know this was a used route a thousand years ago. and the arch leads down into a canyon that opens up and you go up a side canyon into this little alcove where a piece of the ceiling has fallen just slightly. and i found this place. the first time i found this was on the 27th day of a back pack and i got up to this spot and i took my hat off and i stuck my head in the crack, which is something that i do frequently out there, because i know every once in a while you're going it see something back inside one of these cracks. and back in this crack there was a basket about 1500 years old that had been turned upside down so it wouldn't collect anything and it was way back down in the crack so that no light or wind would touch it. and it was in perfect condition. you could put it on your kitchen table. you could put apples in it. and as far as i know, it's still there except for that piece which we went on this trip to collect a piece for radio carbon dating, a federal archeologist in southern utah had asked us to pick up one piece of it to bring out. so that pa
seeing them. >> she leaned on the door of the laundry mat. the asian woman looked at us and resumed folding. your ex's will not be there they are ill literate. >> i bet justin is engaged to that girl. she wiped her eyes with the sleeve of her jacket except for the cancer part. >> i'm never getting married. she sank to the ground her back pressed against the glass. who says that's the meaning of life. it was a beautiful story but if you think about it it's hoeky. there is nothing hoeky about loving someone with your heart and having them love you the same way. that's how everyone doesn't love me. i didn't know what to say. there was nothing hoeky about a great love. yeary 3, 712 and 23 had been painful. some had been bory put it together and it was a life of great love. that was the only way it could be done. empty sidewalk was jammed with people. i held her as they streamed by. thank you. >> from the last 2 pages i wrote in my novel. after the events in entertainment room number 17. with the man who had been pretending to be her husband. the imposter didn't have his own name. he
performance of dacugo in english. as most of you know is a comical one man story telling that uses very limited stage set and instruments and thus it's a japanese tradition performing arts that requires special and traditional and highly trained skills. >> today's story. the hunter. 300 decadesing an in japan there was a man who liked hunting. he told a lie to a bird. or a small light. small harrons make good friends or not. you might find the answer in my story. >> good afternoon. what are you up to these days anything exciting? yes, i have an idea. >> are you going to be the hunter in >> you told on me you're going to be unicorn hunter. it's a kind of snake kind of hunt er japan. you ever seen them. it was a stupid idea. just the one. the japanese proverb says. my prompt cart. please listen. okay. go ahead. i go to where many harrons come to feed. i walled out to one of him in a loud voice like this. [yelling] hello mr. onin. what will the herring think? well i wonder what he wants. i understand he wants to capture me. well, what should i do. no. i can get away easy any time but i
little brother crying. what will happen to us now? if the people don't like us where will we go. we have nowhere to go. will they throw us back to the sea. we don't have a home anymore. anywhere. memory does have a home land. it appeared to me once in the memory of a phone call our mother's bright flame for amy. before i could say, how are you. amy said, a wonder thing happen indeed a conference in japan last month much i was walking with a japanese woman talking about literature when she stopped, turned to me and said, are we still college eyes to you for what we did to your mother in chien and i apologize to you. amy laughed when she said anger disappeared from my life from my very body when my new friend spoke to me. when she acknowledged my childhood grieve and offered hope in the form of an apology. thank you. [applause] >> our next reader is grace angel. she is painter, poet and photographer. married and has 2 girls she is an event planner and art's fundraiser. her works have been exhibited in the bay area and international. she's working on poems entitled, from a fanatic heart. g
1400 ad. i just remember the wind just hailing down on us for days and you would be working down with trowels inside of a trench and if you stop for too long, the sand would start to fill up your hole again because it was blowing so much and everybody was turned away from the wind. so it looked like some kind of religious thing was going on here, all these people bowed to the ground for days and days tinkering with some unimaginable smallness in front of them while the wind just pushed harder and harder, sand blasting across you, filling up all the rooms that you just emptied out as if the desert is rolling back over itself. because even where trails are left, trails disappear out there. nothing stays for too long, even the footprints that last for 7 years eventually disappear. i found something out there that i'd like to read to you. it was a site, an archeological site on the colorado plateau, that i ran into a number of years ago. and i've gone down to it a couple of times now. when i first found it, i had been on the river for 7 days in a canoe. and i tied off and broke throu
says, i used to draw it without air. its lines were easy to follow. and a girl says the sky today is lacking because the cypress is in pieces. and a young man says, no, the sky today is complete because the cypress is in pieces. and i say to myself, it's not obscure or clear. the cypress is in pieces. there is only this. the cypress is in pieces. . >> a poem i wrote shortly after 9-11. the terrorists for rachel cory and all those who were idealists and who actually believed that they could make an effect and social change. the terrorists who lives amongst us is not you, the terrorist who lurks in the shadows of our crowded city streets isn't me. he's not a demon with bulging eyes, a twisted mouth full of dirt, a crooked mouth, fangs driping blood. it's not the savage guner waiting for our school on their way to school. no, this heinous replica of satan doesn't look like a jew. dopt make a
. thank our distinguished guest for being here with us and i hope to have a good time with you guys at the italian cultural institute. thank you. [applause]
[music] [applause] good afternoon, everybody. thank you for joining us today. the first thing i will ask you to do is put your hands together in front of our heart and bow slightly and say nanasta it means the good in me greets the good in all of you. who knows where is this is from? india. today we are sharing an form. we are members of the dance company based here in san francisco and we are taught by somebody who has been doing this art form for over 50 years much the ladies including myself we have been studying with him for a long time. you will see different things. lots of sounds with our feet. a little bit of story telling through mime and expression and you will learn about math in dance. who would have thought. today we will start, our next piece means the coloring of the stage. dancers show the hindu aspect of the dance by using the positions of our hands we will show you we are decorating the stage and make a water picture and cleaning the stage with the water. plucking flowers and decorating the stage with the petals of the flowers. we will awaken the 5 senses throu
that being part of the u.s. conference of mayors i had a lot of discussions with other mayors who are faced with tremendous challenges in their cities and if i have learned anything in the last couple years being both interim mayor and the new mayor and many of you know i'm not a lifelong politician, so i learned the politics of this job somewhat on the job. but one of the things i do know at heart is that we all struggle with this and we know it can never be an answer only that the police can solve or law enforcement in general, that we quickly learn that mental health, that preventing ammunition and guns from getting on the street, that education, job training, paying attention to housing, poverty, isolation, all of those elements lead to the uptick in violence. that's actually quite a strong lesson for all of us mayors to learn as we ask each other for help in solving this. and i want to thank all of you in this audience from adult probation, juvie probation, inter98 (inaudible) for helping me carve what we can do in this city. many of you know i've been a champion for jobs and i trul
of everyone, pedestrians, merchants, the motorists and everyone else who uses the streets. so looking forward to another successful two weeks. happy new year. [ applause ] >> thank you, bond. as you heard, it's a huge partnership on stockton street, there are many, many merchants, but representing the merchant group and someone that we have worked with in all details, making sure that the barricades are in the correct space, making sure that all the merchants understand what the rules are, making sure that everyone knows how things are going to work. if there are complaints, who to go to? our partner in the community, pius lee. >> thank you. mayor ed lee, supervisor david chiu, president of the board of supervisors. dpw mohammed, ladies and gentlemen on behalf of chinatown neighborhood association and merchants of stockton street, we want to thank you for your support and also especially our commissioner bennie. our chinatown chamber of commerce is here. and chinatown merchants association for their understanding, cooperation and joint effort to help the chinese community continue a long sta
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